January 16, 2014 Rio Dulce

Thursday

The taxi driver we used yesterday is taking us to the Litigua bus station this morning. We’ll be listening to water lapping against the dock in Rio Dulce tonight!

He’s late. We wait. An older man waves at us from his taxi. We shake our heads and continue waiting. I see a pick-up with a mounted machine gun in front of a hotel. Half a dozen black vehicles are lined up in the hotel’s curved driveway. In relatively safe Zona 10, machine gun wielding soldiers/security officers are a common sight, but this group means business!

VIP escort

VIP escort

Ten minutes later, we decide to walk over to the certified taxi line. Our driver walks by. “Hey, Marlon!” He is nonchalant. He says his father is taking us. (How would we know that?!? My internal radar should have kicked in.) He takes us over to the man who waved at us earlier. We get in, all the while his father is chuckling with amusement. (Spoiler alert: His good humor isn’t going to last.)

It's a bit startling seeing a man hanging from the local bus, kinda like a stunt man!

It’s a bit startling seeing a man hanging from the local bus, kinda like a stunt man!

Tip: Take the white certified taxis. The trendy, late-model taxis are not considered safe.

After about 20 minutes in the mounting early morning traffic, the landscape changes to more mountainous scenery. I shoot my husband a sideways glance and say it looks like we’re headed out of town! We hurriedly tap Marlon’s father on the shoulder and franticly shake our heads – “WRONG WAY!!! Litegua, not Antigua!”

BIG Tip: Going to a foreign country? Learn as much of the language as possible so as to avoid miscommunications!

He pulls onto the side of the road, waits for cars to pass, reverses gears, going backwards to reach a break in the highway to make a quick U-turn. This is a busy thoroughfare, mind you, so it’s a little hairy! We swing into bumper-to-bumper traffic crawling towards town. One recognizable word he’s muttering is “Idiot!” We finally arrive and miss the bus by 10 minutes. The next bus to Rio Dulce is several hours later. When things like this happen, I try to take it in stride. There’s a reason God wants us to experience this – just wait. It may take a while, but something good will come of it.

This mother at the bus station reluctantly gave permission to be photographed. I'm glad she did!

This mother at the bus station reluctantly gave permission to be photographed. I’m glad she did!

The Litegua bus is comfortable, but the restroom doesn’t work. It’s going to be a long 4 to 5 hour ride. Unclean/pay-to-use restroom stops along the way to Rio Dulce are a discouraging foretaste of what to expect the next two months. *Sigh*

It’s dusk when we arrive in Frontera, the town the Rio Dulce (“Sweet River”) flows by. Most people refer to the town as Rio Dulce. The river starts here after streaming out of the east side of Lago de Izabal, Guatemala’s largest lake.

Tip: There are a couple of ATMs in Frontera, but you might want to go to one of the guarded ATMs in Guat City (or the big town you’re coming from) before arriving. If you decide to use U.S. dollars, merchant exchange rates will be in their favor. Dollar bills must be relatively new, with no folds or tears, or merchants may refuse them.

Now I see why we were destined to miss the first bus – God wants us to have company! Another couple (who missed their bus too!) is also going to the same hotel, Tortugal (“the place of the turtle”) Hotel & Marina. Jacqui and Brian are Australians and we work together to get a launcha to the hotel, not far across the lake. There is a footpath, but it’s not recommended for tourists after dark. A local is kind enough to call the hotel for us and the boat is coming. Darkness rolls across the water as we sit and get acquainted. By the time we all arrive at the hotel’s dock, we’re comfortable with each other. At dinner overlooking the river, Jacqui comes over to our table and suggests we all go exploring together during our stay. Yay – God is good! If we had not missed the first bus, we would have been eating separately and not had the wonderful opportunity to enjoy new friendships!

 

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s